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Sewer Construction Aims to Save City Money

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The City of Milford has been working on sanitary sewer rehabilitation for the reduction of inflow and infiltration water as a part of a 2008 referendum for sewer work around the city. Mostly engineering work until now, the focus will soon be on construction of the City of Milford sewer system to repair and replace sewer pipes to reduce the excess of outside water flowing into the city’s sewer system.

The construction that will soon start on Marshall Street will reduce the cost that the City of Milford pays Kent County Waste Water Treatment Plant in Frederica each year. The City of Milford pays the Kent County Water Treatment Plant by the gallon to ensure the sanitation of city water. The Inflow and Infiltration Study shows several spots of the sewer system that are allowing additional water (groundwater, stormwater, water from individuals’ sub pumps) into the system which is adding to the volume needed to be treated each year. From July 2009 to July 2010 it cost the City of Milford over $1 Million dollars for Inflow and Infiltration water to be treated. In the past 11 months it has cost the City around $520,000.

“…because of this enormous cost [the City of Milford] must take measures to reduce those numbers by making repairs,” stated City Manager David Baird. “The additional amount of water that is entering our sewer system is costing the City too much money. This plan will reduce that.”

The Inflow and Infiltration Study identified several areas of sanitary sewer that need repair or replacement. The original cost estimate of the work needed to be done to repair the priority areas exceeded the funding available for the project and was rejected.
The identified priority area had an estimated cost of $5.3 Million; just for construction costs. Staying focused on fiscal responsibility, the City staff agreed to additional reductions in the scope of work by dividing the sewer rehabilitation into three separate contracts: open cut, cured in place pipe line and cure in place laterals.

Each contract was open for bid and the lowest bid for each project was accepted by City Council. The open cut contract was awarded to Teal Construction Inc. for $986,000, the cured in place main contract was awarded to Insituform Technologies Inc. for $277,932.10 and the cured in place in laterals contract was awarded to BLD Services, LLC for $986,520.

“By rebidding the project into three separate contracts we were able to produce a net savings of $600, 000,” commented Mr. Baird. “I was really encouraged by the City staff and Council working to find an alternative solution that saved the City money.”

According to Mr. Baird the total cost of all three contracts is $2,250,452.10 and is within the budget with sufficient funding in place for the three construction contracts. With City Council approving the bids on Monday, July 11 construction will hopefully begin in August with a completion date set for the first of the year. The area that will be the most affected by the three projects will be Marshall Street between SE Front Street and SE 2nd Street where most of the open cuts to the sewer system will be made.

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