Milford City Council Approves Fire Siren Move, Sewer Bond Referendum Timeline

2On Monday, May 11, 2015, Milford City Council approved $11,000 in cost to relocate the fire siren on the downtown Milford water tower to the top of the tower. The move was a joint effort between the city and the fire department to address concerns from local residents who said the siren was disruptive.

“The electric department will assist in moving the power so that the siren can be relocated to the top,” Mr. Medlarz explained. “We will need to use a crane to physically place the siren, but our employees can handle the electric part of the job.” Mr. Medlarz explained that the current height of the siren caused the sound to bounce off of buildings, making the decibel level much higher. He said that the fire chief believed that moving the siren would allow him to stop using a siren located on Marshall Street.

“I have been listening to fire sirens for 70 years,” Councilman Owen Brooks said. “I don’t see why this is a problem.” Councilman Chris Mergner said that the cost seemed high to move the siren, asking if the fire chief thought this would resolve the problem. Mr. Medlarz said that the fire chief was in favor of the move in order to appease residents and to allow the company to continue using the siren. According to the fire chief, the siren is designed to warn motorists in town that volunteers will be traveling through town to get to the fire company when there is an emergency.

Council approved the request unanimously.

In addition, council approved a sewer bond referendum that would allow the city to borrow funds from the USDA for improvements to the city sewer system. Sewer impact fees would carry the cost of the bond so there would be no increase in sewer costs to residents. However, the city charter requires that bond borrowing must be approved by the voters, so the city must go to referendum. Councilman Mergner asked if it could be clearly stated throughout the process that the referendum would not increase costs to residents and was simply allowing the city to borrow for sewer improvements. Council approved the timeline unanimously.

After executive session, the city rejected an offer made by union representatives for the police contract and authorized the city manager to continue negotiating with the union.

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